The inside scoop from Lowe’s hiring: 3 things to research pre-interview

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Zach Gray is a Talent Acquisition professional with Lowe’s who has a passion for sourcing out hard to find talent, the development of market mapping & market intelligence, and ensuring every one of his candidates has the best experience possible.

Zach Gray Lowe's

This topic is incredibly important because I truly believe that the more research you do on a company you want to work for, will differentiate you from other candidates.

For all of you out there in the professional world that have been at that point in your career where you knew it was time to make a change in your career, the obvious next step is to start looking externally for new opportunities.

So you find this amazing job, with a reputable brand name company, and of course you get all giddy because based on what you see in the job description you are the PERFECT match – such a perfect match that there is not one qualification that you don’t have, and not a single responsibility listed is one you have not done in your career.

So when you get that call from a recruiter and they tell you that they love your background and they want to schedule you for an interview, you better have done your homework on that company.

You are not alone… Numerous candidates don’t know exactly what to research about a company that will make them stand out in an interview.

We now live in an age where there is so much information about any company online, that spending a few minutes researching could be the difference between receiving a job offer or not.

Here’s an example from my personal life that is a great comparison. A few months ago I made the decision to build a fire pit in my backyard, and the first thing I did was to jump online and research the best ways to DIY. I just didn’t grab a shovel, a couple dozen blocks and topsoil and start digging. I did the necessary research to achieve success. Just like I researched how to build a fire pit here are three areas that I recommend you do your homework on in preparation for your next interview:

(1) Recent news about the employer

Almost every employer on their company website has a link to their newsroom and this is a great source to find out information about recent news or events. To be knowledgeable on the company’s latest news, announcements or events is always a great thing to be prepared to speak about in any interview.

(2) The company’s culture & values

As you research any company, try to find out as much as you can from their website about their values and culture of the company. Another great source in researching this subject would be to follow the company on their social media sites. These can be great channels to identify what a company’s culture is and to be able to speak about how you as a candidate are a great match.

(3) Who you are interviewing with

Whether it is an initial phone interview or a 12 person on-site panel, take time to find out who your interviewer is. Nothing impresses interviewers more than a candidate that has clearly done their research and can articulate it well within an interview. Keep in mind also, these are the folks that will be a part of the discussion to make you an offer or not.

So now that we’ve covered some of the must have topics to research before your next interview get out there and start doing your homework. Because if you don’t, other candidates will and that puts them in a better position to receive a job offer and get hired into a role that you felt you were perfect for.


Zach Gray‘s career in talent acquisition spans 8 years, the past 2.5 years with Lowe’s. When he is not working he’s spending time with his beautiful wife and daughter, and tries to spend as much of that time outdoors if possible. He is originally from the Pacific Northwest but now calls North Carolina home. To reach Zach to discuss opportunities at Lowe’s, reach out at 704-758-2688 or email at zach.a.gray@lowes.com.

Opinions expressed are solely my own and do not express the views or opinions of my employer.