Habitat for Humanity’s Fall Fund Drive is underway. Here’s what you need to know

Habitat for Humanity’s Fall Fund Drive is underway. Here’s what you need to know

Photo via Habitat for Humanity of the Charlotte Region

  • Share on Twitter
  • Share on Facebook
  • Share by Email
  • Share on Twitter
  • Share on Facebook
  • Share by Email

This content was created in partnership with Habitat for Humanity of the Charlotte Region.


Habitat for Humanity of the Charlotte Region was founded in 1983 on the belief that affordable homeownership is a powerful tool to change peoples’ lives.

Why it’s important: We’re in an affordable housing crisis. In the Charlotte Region, income has not kept pace with the cost of living. Since 2014, the annual average Mecklenburg Co. home price rose by 34%; income has only risen 18%

  • This disproportionately affects communities of color. In the Charlotte region, the rate of homeownership among white residents is 69%, compared to 42% among Black residents and 38% among Hispanic and Latino residents.

The Fall Fund Drive is an annual fundraising effort where your support for affordable housing in the Charlotte Region can go twice as far.

Advertisement
  • Thanks to a generous gift from the Gee Family Foundation, the first $25,000 in donations will be matched dollar-for-dollar.

Here are five things to know about Habitat for Humanity of the Charlotte Region.


Habitat’s work on affordable homeownership has a direct impact on peoples’ lives.

According to research from the Institute for Social Capital at UNC Charlotte’s Urban Institute:

  • Habitat students’ math and reading proficiency improve once stably housed. Plus, they experience fewer school absences and suspensions.
  • Habitat families report feeling that their lives have improved, that they can spend more time together, that they’re safer, and that they are more connected to the community.

292 families were served in the past year.

That number is made up of a few different buckets:

  • 32 new homes constructed
  • 19 existing homes
  • 112 Money Matters Financial literacy education participants
  • 129 Critical Home Repairs

All of that wouldn’t have been possible without the 14,000+ hours that volunteers put in.

In addition to building new homes, Habitat also repairs existing ones.

Before and after Habitat’s 1,000th Critical Home Repair. Photo via Habitat for Humanity.

The Critical Home Repair program provides comprehensive repairs to make a home safer and extend its functional life.

  • The program allows owners who might otherwise get displaced to remain in their homes.
  • Plus, repairing existing homes helps retain affordable housing stock in Charlotte.

Habitat recently broke ground on their most innovative housing project to date.

The Meadows at Plato Price will be a 39-home community in West Charlotte. It’s currently being built by future homeowners, Habitat staff and volunteers.

  • The land (that originally housed the all-Black Plato Price School) was donated to Habitat Charlotte Region by the City of Charlotte in 2018.

There are lots of ways to make an impact with Habitat.

Option 1: Monetary donations. 90 cents of every dollar Habitat receives goes directly back into its programs. Here’s how your donations add up:

  • $100: Nails for one project
  • $500: Paint for four Critical Home Repair projects
  • $1,000: Front porches for four homes
  • $150,000: Land, building materials and labor costs for one home

Option 2: Volunteer through construction, ReStore, office support and more. Learn more about volunteering.

Option 3: Shop and donate at one of the seven area ReStores. ReStores sell new and gently used home decor, building supplies, furniture, books and more.

  • You can also donate unwanted items to the ReStore, and they’ll even come pick up bulky items.

Ready to help? Donate to the Fall Fund Drive to make your money go twice as far.

This content was created in partnership with Habitat for Humanity of the Charlotte Region.

Story Views:
SIGN UP
Join the 107,974 smart Charlotteans that receive our daily newsletter.
"It's good. I promise." - Emma   Emma Way